Theory Thursday: The Power of Consistency

Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds,” way back in 1841, but in 2016, I say “A lack of consistency is the blood-sucking leech of all our minds.”

You’ve probably guessed by now that this ties in with Grit. Dr. Duckworth’s book is full ofthe importance of consistency. Consistency is the key, but don’t take my word for it:

Comedian Louis C.K., in a July 6, 2011 interview with the A/V Club, said “I’ve learned from experience that if you work harder at it, and apply more energy and time to it, and more consistency, you get a better result. It comes from the work.”

John Wooden, legendary UCLA basketball coach, famously said, “Self-Control creates consistency. Consistency is crucial to getting to the top and staying there.”

Kevin Nash, the famous pro-wrestler, was once asked if he had any workout secrets or tips he could share with the readers. Rather than reply with his customary swaggering humor, he gave a one-word answer: “Consistency.” (I wish I could find the link to this interview, but it’s been 15 years or so since I watched wrestling. The answer stuck with me…Nash, by the way, is still working at age 56, albeit at a reduced pace. That’s consistency.).

Sean “Seanwes” McCabe explains in a video and article the importance of consistency: “Show Up Every Day for Two Years.” It’s his “secret” to building a platform and a following as an author and web personality.

Just google “importance of consistency”, and you’ll get several days of reading material. Or try “consistency in parenting” for even more googly goodness.

Consistency is everything, and it’s the hardest thing for some of us (myself especially) to practice.

Why is it so important? Partly because the only way to get better at something is to do it, over and over again, usually in the form of deliberate practice.

Deliberate practice means doing the hard work to improve skills, working on the weak spots rather than doing what’s most fun. It’s playing scales or replaying the three measures you never can get right, rather than breezing through the rest of the song. It’s the difference between rehearsal and just singing through a few songs.

I’ll write more about deliberate practice later, but it’s the hard work that makes you better at whatever it is you’re doing. You can get a little better by just playing through, but you’ll never really attain mastery without breaking it down and practicing hard.

And one day of practice isn’t enough. You need to do it every day. Maybe you can take weekends off like you do in your day job. Maybe you can take Christmas and Thanksgiving off. Maybe not. But you have to hit it like a real job, every day.

Health is the same way. If I eat vegan 2-3 random days a week, what good does that do for me or the environment or anyone?

I can tell you what good my sporadic attempts at exercise have done for me: nada. Zilch. Zip.

And if you’re trying to build a presence online, you need to put out content that someone out there finds encouraging, entertaining, informative, inspiring, or otherwise valuable, and you need to do it on a regular, reliable basis. Whenever you want won’t cut it.

Consistency is everything.

But consistency is HARD. Developing consistency requires commitment, courage, time management, energy, time, and a few other ingredients that I honestly don’t understand yet.

And in the course of my Grit studies, I’ll be looking for those ingredients. Because I need consistency, and so do my students.

 

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