Hypocrisy & Bigotry in the Name of Security

​https://youtu.be/ofmgafP9Ht4

Trump’s ban led to people who were on flights to the US when the executive order was signed being detained or sent back, and even affects green card holders, who are very well vetted as I’m sure you know. 

So Trump cites the 9/11 attacks as part of his justification for a total ban, but NONE of the countries that the actual 9/11 hijackers came from are actually on the list… like Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Lebanon, and the Emirates. 

Why? Well, none of the countries Trump has major business interests in are on the list … like Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and the Emirates.

And as far as Americans killed by terrorists fromTrump’s magnificent seven, the total is 0. Zero. Zilch.

Now, for Americans killed by terrorists from Trump’s not-banned business buddies, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and the Emirates: 3,000.

Well, at least Trump is putting one American first.

Source: New York Daily News

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Five Great Things About Microfinance

1) It builds wealth in the poorest countries. Some problems are problems of wealth distribution. But in many developing nations, the problem is a lack of wealth, period.Looking around Kiva’s website, I see many nations where the average yearly salary is less than my monthly take-home pay … and I work in education, not medicine or law.

Microfinance can help both situations, because it helps people create and expand small businesses and farms. This means more genuine goods and services delivered where they are needed most.

And nations with strong middle classes are much more resistant to manipulation and exploitation by large corporations and corrupt government officials. These loans don’t help Exxon or Goldman-Sachs. They help families.

2) It helps women especially. In many male-dominated societies, microfinance is one of, if not the, only way for women to get the capital to start businesses. And having their own businesses, and their own money, helps put women on an even footing with men. This can have a powerful equalizing effect on society.

3) It helps children, too. Families with small businesses can often afford to send their kids to school, rather than keeping them out to work. Many of the loan requests I’ve read on Kiva mention that very thing. The more kids stay in school, the fewer end up as child brides, child soldiers, child prostitutes, or, more commonly, unskilled laborers living lives of poverty.

4) It’s the gift that keeps on giving. Because you’re making a tiny loan, and not giving a donation, the entrepreneur will repay it in time. Then you’ll be able to take that same money and lend it out to someone else. You can keep the same money in circulation or you can add more each month, creating a snowball effect.

5) It’s cheap. The cost of entry is only $25 on Kiva, the world’s leading microfinance operation. And once it’s repaid, you have the option of taking your money back. So you’ve got very little to lose. Why not head over to Kiva (or to WorldVision’s microfinance department) and check it out?