The Value of the Eternal Student

Sometimes i worry that there are so many things i haven’t mastered,  so many things i can’t teach my daughter from a position of authoritative knowledge. 

I know their number will only grow greater as she gets older and learns more. 

But I think,  perhaps, that Matty not be all bad.  There are skilled teachers in all manner of subjects all around. 

Maybe if her day can’t teach her, he (I) can go learn it alongside her. 

If nothing else, I’ll teach her that it’s never too late to learn. 

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Five Great Things About Microfinance

1) It builds wealth in the poorest countries. Some problems are problems of wealth distribution. But in many developing nations, the problem is a lack of wealth, period.Looking around Kiva’s website, I see many nations where the average yearly salary is less than my monthly take-home pay … and I work in education, not medicine or law.

Microfinance can help both situations, because it helps people create and expand small businesses and farms. This means more genuine goods and services delivered where they are needed most.

And nations with strong middle classes are much more resistant to manipulation and exploitation by large corporations and corrupt government officials. These loans don’t help Exxon or Goldman-Sachs. They help families.

2) It helps women especially. In many male-dominated societies, microfinance is one of, if not the, only way for women to get the capital to start businesses. And having their own businesses, and their own money, helps put women on an even footing with men. This can have a powerful equalizing effect on society.

3) It helps children, too. Families with small businesses can often afford to send their kids to school, rather than keeping them out to work. Many of the loan requests I’ve read on Kiva mention that very thing. The more kids stay in school, the fewer end up as child brides, child soldiers, child prostitutes, or, more commonly, unskilled laborers living lives of poverty.

4) It’s the gift that keeps on giving. Because you’re making a tiny loan, and not giving a donation, the entrepreneur will repay it in time. Then you’ll be able to take that same money and lend it out to someone else. You can keep the same money in circulation or you can add more each month, creating a snowball effect.

5) It’s cheap. The cost of entry is only $25 on Kiva, the world’s leading microfinance operation. And once it’s repaid, you have the option of taking your money back. So you’ve got very little to lose. Why not head over to Kiva (or to WorldVision’s microfinance department) and check it out?

Another Brick in the Wall (Kyklos, Violence, and Oppression)

Danielle, a good friend of mine, posted this George Carlin quote about education (the image is from “Knowledge of Today,” but I have no idea who owns the copyright on the quote or the photo itself. No infringement intended).

from "Knowledge of Today"

from “Knowledge of Today”

And I immediately thought of two things:

1) The industrial revolution, assembly-line origins of our American public school system. To vastly oversimplify, factory owners and big business owners favored and helped fund public education because they needed literate, competent workers. Critical thinking and independent analysis were not priorities.

2) Pink Floyd’s “Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2” video.

Well, I hadn’t watched that video in a long time, and I have to say, it’s still pretty shocking. It’s a terrible, unsanitized exploration of two types of human dysfunction (or, if you will, two kinds of human evil):

Dehumanizing institutionalization (fallen, twisted order)

Blind, rioting rage (fallen, twisted chaos)

It seems we so often rush from one unholy, inhumane extreme to the other (I’d argue that from a Christian perspective, any definition of “holy” that doesn’t massively overlap with “humane” is fatally flawed, but that’s a topic for another post).

The French kings, starting with Louis XIV, crushed the peasants financially and turned the nobility into pampered lapdogs. The French revolution slaughtered thousands, almost indiscriminately.

The Russian Tsars oppressed the weak and persecuted the Jews. The Communists killed tens of millions, erasing whole villages from the maps and the history books.

Plato and Polybius saw this in ancient Greece. They called it Kyklos, the cycle of oppression and revolution.

And in the video, the same children that were so ground down, so oppressed into banal sameness by that terrible school … devolved into the violent homogeneity of a riot, culminating with burning the school and dragging the hated teacher toward the bonfire to be burned alive.

This is our way as humans. We cast of the shackles of one evil, and run headlong into another. We burn down the palace and slaughter all inside, then cry out for the next strong man who promises order. And for him, we build an even bigger palace.

Things won’t get better just because we kill (or even jail or disgrace) the right people. Building up is harder, but it’s the only thing that works, long-term.

A Clarification about Complementarianism

In writing about complementarianism yesterday, I did something that I’m all too often guilty of doing: I talked about the more radical edge of it as if it were the whole.

In other words, I talked about complementarianism in a way that makes all those who identify as complementarian sound utterly sexist.  That was not my intent, clearly.

Complementarianism as it exists in America, is a broad and difficult to define concept … so slippery, that the From Two to One marriage blog spent four posts just defining terms!

At the most minimal core, complementarianism is the belief that men and women are different in some way, and have some kind of difference in their God-given roles.  I think most of us believe that to some degree.

But that definition is too broad to be useful.  It’s like a man who was taking a hot-air balloon ride, and, looking down, didn’t recognize the landscape.  “Engineer,” he asked, panicked that they might be lost, “where are we?”  The engineer looked over the edge, looked back at the man, and said, “We’re in a balloon.”

Well, thanks.

An actual useful definition of complementarianism would need to be narrow enough that it actually excludes more than a handful of people.  So what I’m talking about is the idea of God-ordained different roles, to the extent of:

  1. Male headship in the home (wifely submission, as opposed to egalitarianism’s mutual submission and equal leadership)
  2. Male headship in the church (women may be excluded from all leadership roles, or possibly just the priestly/preaching role)
  3. The preparation of the next generation of girls to be good wives, first and foremost.

#3 is the one that troubles me the most.  I have no problem with women choosing to live in complementarian marriages, choosing to subordinate themselves to their husbands.  But I do have a problem with girls being told that that’s their role, and that’s where their worth and righteousness comes from.  I have a problem with girls being pushed to not get an education, to marry young, and to stay married even if the husband abuses them.

And while not everyone who calls themselves complementarian takes this approach, it is not a rare or unique thing.  Heaven Ministries, Buried Treasure,  and Ladies Against Feminism have all published articles questioning the need for higher education or outright advising against it for women.  A simple Google Search turns up even more.

So, I guess what I’m saying is that there is a significant group within the wide tent of complementarianism that I have a serious problem with.  While I don’t want to paint everyone who takes that title with the same brush, I feel like I have to stand up and speak out.  Because this affects our daughters, our sisters, our female friends, and that means it affects us all.