Self-Care 2: 10% Human

To make a long story short, animals in general and humans in particular aren’t solo organisms, but macro-organisms, reliant upon symbiotic bacteria for most of our digestion and a surprising amount of our general health. 

By number of cells, we are 10% human and 90% bacteria. 

And if  we let our bacteria get too out of whack, we increase our risks of indigestion, heart disease, diabetes, and more of the diseases of modernity.

So one of my goals this year is to eat with my bacteria in mind. 

And apparently, it doesn’t take long to see changes based on diet. Unfortunately, I can’t get the original study to load, but what I’ve read in other places  backs up Miche’s vlog:

We see results within days of serious diet changes, and continue to see lifelong benefits.

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Humans Are Herbivores

​https://youtu.be/XmXynDLkbXY

I love this video series. If you view the video on YouTube,  he puts links to his sources in the description.

His video on the visual predation hypothesis is great, too.

MAYBE he gets a little too moralistic about being vegan, I guess, but Mic’s videos are great motivation-boosters. 

Each one is a scientific, evidence-packed pep talk. Check them out. 

Meat-Free Monday: The Best Reason

There’s another reason that I’m going vegan, and it’s both a moral and a health reason: I want to be there for my daughter for as long as I can.

She’s 3. I’m 41. She should not have to bury her father anytime soon. Assuming she has kids, they deserve to get to know their grandfather.

Now, I’m not ticking off the time. Most of my recent male ancestors made it to 80 and beyond. One great-grandfather died young, at 59, from a heart attack.

But none of them (not even the one who died young) was fat. And, in case my profile picture and last Monday’s weigh-in haven’t tipped you off, I am.

Now, I’m all about body positivity, so when I say “fat,” I mean it descriptively, not pejoratively. I’m definitely a big deal.

And while the actual evidence about BMI and morbidity is a lot more complex than the diet pill pushers want you to believe: BMI is a terrible measure of health, to the point of “lying by scientific authority,” and the topic of weight and weight loss are so emotionally and financially fraught that they’ve developed their own mythology.

Read Rethinking Thin by Gina Kolata and Health at Every Size by Linda Bacon to see how some of that mythology developed, and to see through some of it.
BMI balderdash aside, even at 6’7″ tall, it can’t be healthy to weigh 375 pounds.

And while diets have been repeatedly proven to not work in the long term, I promise I’m not dieting (I lost another 2-3 pounds this week, depending on how I stand on the scale, but I promise I’ve been sucking down food like a vegan vacuum cleaner), so I hope I can escape the almost certain re-gaining plus interest that comes after five years.

In all the health and weight talk, people often forget to mention one thing:mobility. I was slowing down. I was getting hurt more easily. It was getting harder and harder to keep up with my little girl.

And while I’m still not ready for the Olympics, I’m doing a lot better. It’s easier to get down to the floor and back up again, I move more quickly, I feel better, and I’m even healing a little faster. Swimming has helped, to be sure, and so has the lost weight, but I feel like my eating has really “fueled” the improvements.
Eat better, feel better. There you go!

Meat-Free Monday: The Journey Begins

I’m moving toward becoming vegan.

So you may ask why I would do such a thing, given my lifelong predilection towards eating meat, loving cheese, and the whole 9 yards. You might also ask what chance I have of actually successfully riding this out, given my short-lived, idealistic attempts at any number of other eating plans in the past: South Beach, staying clear of dairy (which I’ve done several times for various health-related reasons … first because of sinus, then because of actual lactose intolerance), Weight Watchers, and some vaguely bean and greens based diet with lots of protein and nutritional faddish vitamins and stuff.

Well, my reasons actually go back a while. As you may recall, some time ago (September 2012, actually) I tried to give up on factory farmed meat eggs and dairy. The problem with this was that I still wanted to eat meat eggs and dairy in the same proportions as I did before (which never works, but I’ll talk about that more later). Free range anything is going to be twice as expensive, and free range is not a very well-regulated term so it doesn’t necessarily mean anything.

As so many other things did this came to an end, due to “something.” In this case, the “something” was pretty big: a tornado hit my house, and 12 days later my daughter was born. In this case, I can be excused from falling off whatever wagon I was teetering upon at the time.

However, I am a flake, so if it wasn’t a tornado and a childbirth, it probably would’ve been some other “something.”

I could say that the reason I did this or started this I haven’t done it yet was as I looked at the scale and saw that it read 375. I’m a tall guy (6’7” – that’s 2 meters for y’all in the rest of the world), but 375 pounds is about 170 kg. It’s a lot. My BMI and my age are running neck and neck, and they’re about to catch up with Douglas Adams’ favorite number (Not that the BMI is a reliable or valid measurement of health, but goodness!)

Honestly, I got over the sticker shock of 375 pounds a long time before I ever thought of reducing animal intake.

In fact, I talked about even going on diets, which I don’t really believe in due to the medical evidence and of extremely high failure rates over a five-year period, and the medical evidence of the damage that weight cycling does to a person’s metabolism and their body overall. I’ve done a lot of reading, and the only things that work for major sustainable weight loss are gastric bypass or a major shift of consciousness that causes the person to start over in their entire relationship to food, exercise and activity, and their whole mind-body connection. So in short, it’s either cut out part of your stomach, or give your entire mindset major surgery.

What really put me back on this path was having lunch with Sally Jane Black, who you might know from Letterboxd, where she is the best film critic of her generation, or if you’re really lucky from role-playing gaming where she is the best GM I’ve ever encountered of any generation. And yes, I’m name dropping. Sally Jane has been a vegetarian for as long as I’ve known her, since she was a teenager I think. And Katherine and I had talked about reducing our animal intake, making more vegetable dishes, just trying to eat a little bit more healthfully since we know that the average American eats too much meat and dairy on an average yearly basis. So Katherine asked her what she cook how did she eat. That just sort of started my mind rolling.

That afternoon, we went to the Audubon zoo. After several hours there, we stopped to get some refreshments. Katherine and the little one got ice cream, but I was leery about getting anything so heavily dairy when I was in New Orleans, a city not well known for easy bathroom access. We would be doing a lot of walking that day to lots of different places, and I wanted to be ‘normal’ for it. But then I saw that the concession stand at the zoo where they were getting their ice cream had sorbet. I bought the mango, and said after one taste, “If I can get sorbet half this good, I’ll never want to eat ice cream again.” And I meant it. If you have access to Häagen-Dazs mango sorbet, try it.

In addition to being a tasty treat, it was an eye-opening moment. I enjoyed that mango sorbet as much or more than I’ve ever enjoyed any ice cream I’ve ever had. Maybe the heat of the day and the fun of touring a zoo with a three year old made it taste sweeter, but in my mind, I realized I didn’t have to suffer to do this. For the first time, I really believed it.

So within a week of that trip I stumbled across Main Street Vegan, a book about going vegan when you don’t live in New York City , LA, or Portland, when you don’t make six figures, when you don’t have a Whole Foods and a market right at your doorstep. It’s a book about going vegan when you have a family that may not also want to do that, when you have kids, so you can’t spend an hour and a half fixing a massive multi-ingredient delicate foodie type recipe, even if you wanted to, which I have never in my life wanted to do that – I’ll eat a meal it’s been prepared with that kind of love and attention to detail, and I will complement the chef profusely, but I’ve never felt deserved the desire to actually do that. I write, I sing well enough for three-year-old audience, and I like to do visually artsy type things though again I’m about good enough for three-year-old audience.

So started reading Main Street Vegan, and I was pretty well convinced by the time I got to the sample material that I was going to buy the book, and I was sure is gonna make some kind of go of it.

Since then I’ve spent some time online, and I found out that not every vegan lives in a major city or even a progressive area, and not every vegan is a foodie. Monique, the “Brown Vegan,” has a lot of practical information for those of us who don’t secretly wish to attend the Culinary Institute.  Some vegans prefer raw foods, which are great because they don’t take that much time and they are generally hard to screw up, which is really good for me.

Although I am not sure how people make all of those smoothies. Every time I make a smoothie and ends up just kind of okay, but certainly not worth the extensive cleanup that comes afterwards. Only takes five minutes to make a smoothie, and an hour to clean the blender. Well, I’d rather eat my food rather than drink it anyway, so even if I never solve that particular riddle, I’ll be fine.

To make a long story short, I did the research and came to believe I could actually do this.

And here’s my final reason: the little one is getting old enough to ask questions. She watches a lot of cartoons about animals, like A Turtle’s Tale (the first one is very educational, and has a great sense of timing, pausing to let the viewer feel the wonder of the oceans or witness the devastation wrought by pollution like an oil spill) or the various Land Before Time sequels.

And inevitably, the biggest fear the protagonists have is predation. Nobody wants to be eaten.

So, what am I going to say when she asks me “why do we eat animals?”

I can’t tell her we need to do it to survive.

I can’t tell her it’s nature’s way. We choose our path. We don’t just follow instincts.

Previously, I’d have to tell her “Because people have eaten animals for a long time, and we don’t care enough to ask if we still need to. But mostly, because they taste good.”

And I don’t want to be the kind of person who tells his daughter that concern for animals is stupid, that empathy is a liability, if the animal tastes good.

But now, if I succeed at this, when she asks “why do we eat animals?” I can say “Daddy doesn’t.”

And that’s an answer I can live with.

 

 

An Epidemic of Obesity, a Pandemic of Self-Hate

Obetrol, with amphetamines, a favorite of Andy Warhol

Obetrol, with amphetamines, a favorite of Andy Warhol

America suffers from an epidemic of obesity. Ask anyone.

But America also suffers from a pandemic of body-hate, shame, and self-loathing.

Ask anyone who’s tried to lose weight, or worse, lost it only to regain it.

Why the obesity epidemic? There are so many possible explanations:

  • the wider availability of high-quality food,
  • the end of hunger (though not necessarily malnutrition) in the industrialized world,
  • more sedentary lives,
  • high-fructose corn syrup,
  • video games,
  • a downward cycle of yo-yo dieting, etc.

Why the self-loathing pandemic? There are just as many possible explanations:

  • the sheer fact of our increasing weight
  • media idols held up as impossible ideals
  • relentless messages from media, friends, family

All these play a part, I’m sure. But this is America, and I think we all know the #1 reason we hate our bodies so much. There is a lot of money in selling hate. $60 billion a year, according to Marketdata Enterprises.

As Christians, we realize that all people are the image-bearers of God. That all people are loved by God, loved to the point that he emptied Himself of His glory and power, walked on earth, and even died for us.

You and I are part of “all people.” You and I are loved that much, by that awesome of a God.

So why do we hate ourselves so much?  That hatred does not come from above.

I am hesitant to call things Satanic, but self-loathing is, and those who spread or profit from it for any reason should be ashamed of themselves. Its fires burn in every skeletal anorexic, every compulsive eater, every cutter, every suicide.

What does that mean for our bodies? I think we owe it to ourselves, and maybe even to God, to try to keep ourselves in good health. And that includes not only illness but physical fitness. I have reached a point in my life when I have fallen far short of this goal. I must struggle to strengthen my body, and resist the things that weaken me. Fortunately, it isn’t always hardship.

But the driving force that leads us to care for our bodies should be love. It should not be Hollywood, magazines, or the advertising machine of the diet and weight-loss industry. And our goals should not be to look like Brad Pitt or Angelina Jolie. Vanity is no virtue, and envy is a poor motivator.

And most of all, we should learn to see ourselves as God sees us, to love our own bodies as they are, “fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psalm 139:14) … not as they will be “after I lose 20 (or 50, or 100) pounds.”

Research shows that those of us who are really heavy will probably never be thin, not for the long term. But most of us can be a lot healthier than we are now.

And all of us can learn to close our ears to the malevolent, avaricious cacophony of advertisers, to gracefully throw off our body-shame, our self-loathing, and to let God’s love flow through our bodies … even if they weigh 350 pounds.